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the dots. fbi's john o'neal was one that did so. remarkable, well-trained, thoughtful. for years he had leaped that al qaeda was coming back to his city. he knew about 1993. he suspected another attack would come on those buildings. he did everything he could to move the fbi towards recognizing the threat. he did lead a son with other agencies and the white house and overseas guests. john o'neal was kind of a cassandra and he really knew was coming and kept warning of it. eventually he got discouraged and he retired in the fbi fbi and then he took a new job. he took a job as head of security at the world trade center in new york city so he turned up for work in august of 2001 and he kept that job only for a few days. he was on the scene when it all happened and he died in the rubble. so that kind of citizen is one reason i wanted to write the book. another one is a very different reason. i wanted to write this short book to talk about the way we do have a grand strategy in our fight against terrorism. i don't think a lot of americans know that or they don't see all the pieces. i tried t
. but she found herself targeted by multiple federal agencies, including the i.r.s., the f.b.i., the bureau of alcohol, tobacco, and firearms, osha, none of which had ever contacted her family's businesses before, her involvement in grass-roots activism. as ms. engelbrecht recently told a house committee, "we have never been audited, we had never been investigated but all that change the pofn submitting applications for the nonprofit status for true the vote and king street patriots. since that filing, my private businesses, my nonprofit organizations and my family have been subjected to more than 15 instances of audit or inquiry by federal agencies." make no mistake, the proposed i.r.s. rule would make it even harder for people like ms. engelbrech to participate in the political process, something that is her still right. and it strongly discourage other similarly interested and concerned citizens from exercising their rights. in other words, it would strike at the very heart of self-government and at the very heart of the american democracy. the i.r.s. was met to be a tax collection agenc
home in harlem a few months before he died. >> you set on said on the record that you think the fbi may have given you cancer in a. >> almost certainly. extremely advanced and there's no question after the assassination of martin luther king, they themselves have had to change the method with what they consider to be leaders. and of course one of the best ways to do it. and they say jokingly that the 1600 the indians could catch smallpox and they could give us cancer with their laser beams today. and of course america is involved with a warfare. >> host: did the fbi watch stokely carmichael? >> guest: absolutely. very famously they have a counterintelligence program that has initially been started in the 1950s and is supposed to be anti-communist. and it quickly becomes something that is used to provide surveillance over civil rights activist and pro-democracy activists and black power revolutionaries and carmichael has an extensive fbi file. the state department, the united states intelligence services, the fbi is watching them all the time, especially for the black power speech of jun
involving the fbi and the like but the point is to journalists today are also reworded for the eyeball grabbing headline that's substance so you will often see these things reported as fact that if you pull back and say that's not the case, that would be everything from famously 60 minutes reported a story about a cyber attack that took down brazilian power grids. it just didn't happen to withstand the power were great. a couple dudes took used rifles to shoot at power transformers in california, didn't take down the grid, but it did become a major news story in doubles street journal. now, i then bought a series of phone calls from journalists calling for my opinion on this cyber attack so it is a double layer thing. the last question about his area and psychological approaches at the very same time that you had over 600,000 people in pennsylvania without power. wall street journal has a news story that didn't leave anyone without power but then you also have a bunch of people interpreting that as a cyber attack. because somehow i keep you in all of these cyber powers. that is a probl
could find those. also personal papers. also under surveillance. fbi, mississippi highway patrol, in the mississippi state sovereignty commission which was an organization with the express purpose how to preserve racial segregation so i had public-relations to present mississippi and a positive light to the tourist but also surveillance there was an informant on the march that was reporting back to the state of mississippi classified as informant tax. he/she produced very detailed reports what was going on in meetings from civil rights leaders in the middle of the controversy. that was complex. in those officials tended to exaggerated makeup stuff but it is important to understand the ways it was watched. the last major aspect was talking to the people in the march i interviewed 100 people who were in for -- involved with that brought this was not adjusted national story about political conflicts or ideas but physical participation of the marchers a coming of age the unique experience in for some tragic and disappointing to bring up the personal stories gave the extra layer. >> h
, there is an ongoing fbi investigation, so we are restricted in terms of the people to whom we can speak. >> about all groups or the other groups? >> about the initial group of people we identified, but we are doing an audit and we have spoken to a few people who have already gone through that process but i don't have a due date for that and are also need to stress too that the below list that we identified that some of which had these progressive groups listed on them, our mandate was to look at the political advocacy or the campaign activities of these groups, approximately 298 of them. and only three had the name progressive in them. i have to again, i made this point before, i was not in a position to determine just because a group had the name progressives in it automatically meant that it had one political affiliation or persuasion or another. that was not the purpose of this. others interpreted it that way. it was not in our report or in any of my public comments. i noticed conservative groups were targeted. >> let me just say this to you. your department, made a grave error in going public, no
to the doorstep including the irs and fbi and osha and bureau of alcohol, tobacco, and firearms. at last count rings there's been in the last three years, that 25-plus investigations or inquiries into my personal business. now, this morning, as many of you know, i'm sure, the co-founder of tea party patriots is testifying before congress on the same types of irs abuse and targeting that this administration is now looking to legalize, to codify. we've started a website, and i have a call to action for you this morning. we started a website called we will not be sleepsed -- wewillnotbesilenceed.org. i'll lay it out quickly. the irs has attempted to write into law regulations that will so stifle political speech that it will change unalterably the landscape of nonprofit organizations, much of which the type you belong to here in this room. standard levels of voter education and engagement will be made illegal in these regulations if they are allowed to pass. there is a window of time for citizen comment, and that window ends tonight at midnight. tonight at midnight. go to wewillnotbesilenceed.org
figured out they could develop their own whipping post so if liberals were hammering the fbi or the cia for their abuse of power conservatives could hammer the welfare agencies, the department of education, the environmental protection agency. literally they were deconstructing the news to advance their political agenda and in the seats of tbn i saw the blueprint of "fox news." it's a lasting story because ailes does not talk about tbn much. he is glossed over that part of his career but he was in this environment and soaking up these techniques that 20 years later he would use an and "fox news." >> host: what about the idea of repetition. tuc foxes repeating the message throughout the day? >> guest: that is one of the principles box uses as they develop story lines. the health care debate was a classic storyline the run-up to the iraq war. >> host: good guys, bad guys? >> guest: they developed adversary so let's take the case of iraq. "fox news" was hammering the united nations and france and remember the whole freedom fries thing quick they were hammering al-jazeera the airbase televi
they figured out they could develop their own posts. so if liberals were hammering the fbi and cia for their abuser abuses of power, then the conservatives could hammer the welfare agencies, the department of education by the environmental protection agency, conservatives could have their own boogie man to beat up on it. on. so literally they were kind of deconstructing is to advance a political agenda, and i saw a blueprinsolve ablueprint on foxs a fascinating story because ailes didn't talk about it most and in most of the interviews he lost over that part of the biography. but he was working there and he was in the environment and he was soaking up the techniques that 20 years later he applied at fox news. it is classic and driving the message. >> guest: they develop story lines into the health care debate was a classic fox news story line going back in the time of the iraq war and the run-up to the iraq war. >> host: what do you mean by good guys, bad guys? >> guest: they develop adversaries to the case of iraq. fox news was hammering the united nations and remember the whole f
of homeland security and the fbi specifically, i think those relationships are good with secretary johnson in place but i think we will take some for the steps forward and will meet with him and a couple of weeks. team sport, something we have to work together. i'm concerned that our policy and laws lag behind us and part of that is educating people, the american people and our administration and congress and the courts on what's going on in this space. many of the issues that we've worked our way through over the last five years on the industry side working with the fisa court boils down to an understanding of what's going on in cyberspace. our ability to articulate it, and their understanding of what we are talking about. this makes this area especially difficult and one that i think we need to step back, set a framework for discussion with the american people. this is going to be actually important in setting up what we can and cannot be in cyberspace to protect this country. and for my perspective is going to be one of the big issues as we move forward. i think a precursor to that is g
-abiding americans safe. according to the f.b.i., in 2012, 95 law enforcement officers were killed in line-of-duty incidents and 52,901 officers were victims of line-of-duty assaults. 52,901. "the new york times" in 2012 observed, "as violent crime has decreased across the country, a disturbing trend has emerged: rising numbers of police officers being killed." in 2008, 41 officers were killed. 41. in 2009, 48 officers were killed. in 2010, 56 officers were killed. in 2011, 72 officers were killed. and in 2012, 95 officers were killed. unfortunately, as byron york noted today, "the new york times" has not reported on the controversial nomination of debo adegbile to head the d.o.j. civil rights division. it is out of respect for all of our nation's police officers that i rise to oppose mr. adegbile's nomination. under adegbile's leadership and supervision, the naacp legal defense fund brazenly politicized the murder of a philadelphia police officers, officer daniel faulkner. on december 9, 19 81, 25-year-old officer faulkner was murdered by wesley cook, who is widely known as mumia abu-jama
to individuals charge, which we refer all issues to the fbi and then they move in, and they did their investigation and, ultimately, this determines whether or not a crime is committed, and we believe ensuring those individuals are held accountable to the fullest extent of the law. >> do you have the numbers how many are prosecuted in a way and then discipline and then prosecution. >> i don't have that information with me currently, but i can provide that for the record. >> do you have that? >> yes. >> thank you. any studies on the effects of solitary confinement on recidivism and early entry? >> there's been no stoids as a result of the hearing conducted in 2012 when that was presented to me, and we have not participated in any type of study. we dprea to undergo the analysis that's take b place right now with cna, and hopefully from that review, we'll have some insight, but, senator, i have to add, when you are looking at recidivism, that will require a long period of time to assess when you're looking at the number of individuals who have since been released and impact on reci
. i've met with homeland security, fbi to try to resolve this iss issue. and unfortunately to say since i've been asking questions, it seems to be getting worse. i'll discuss it with you privately. it's not your responsibility but again tsa does have some bearing his i just want to discuss a we deprived that i do want to cause any other extra problems to the person by mentioning his name publicly. >> glad to take up for the record. >> let me also say i agree with the jurisdictional problems. i think it detracts from your mission. it's something i would like to fix. we have a hearing scheduled on this issue, and the aspen institute he met with a very good video called homeland confusion or so with that i recognize the gentle way from texas, ms. sheila jackson lee. >> thank you very much, mr. chairman, for the string. secretary, again thank you for your commitment to service. and might i just echo two of my preceding colleagues, it would be great if we ourselves self regulated ourselves with respect to the streamlining of committees that address the question of homeland security. so
it is the new silk road, whether it is the fbi or promoting afghan businesses is something that i think americans will continue to be interested in this relationship and finally something i don't think that needs to be much detail but i think that he focus on counter extremism, not just counterterrorism but extremism in afghanistan and that is a very important part as well. so the region and the economic issues the counter extremism for the future relationship in afghanistan and the united states. >> thank you, claire. i would like to start by thinking the organizerthanking l that they do on afghanistan in the region and for this timely discussion. i've been asked to focus my remarks on governance in iraq like to look back at the last decade in which all a few lessons. shortly after the tragedy of 9/11 a few miles from here a few days after 9/11 he convened a small group and reflected that it would likely be an invasion that the u.s. would use military force. it was then it would collapse and he said the key question was going to be how do afghan individuals and groups agree on the rule
to the world markets. so the economic aspects of this whether it's the new silk road, whether it's the fbi, whether it's promoting afghan businesses is something better think americans will continue to be interested in as part of this future relationship. and, finally, saw but i don't think that needs to be much detail but that's to keep focus on counter extremism but not just counterterrorism, extremism. afghanistan is still an important part of the area as well. so the region, economic issues, counter extremism, the foundations for future relationship in afghanistan and the united states. once again i thank the organizers of this to give me this opportunity and i look forward to the rest of the panel and your comments and questions. >> thank you. clare. >> thank you. and i would like to start also by thanking the organizers for all that they do on afghanistan, the region, and for this timely discussion. i've been asked to focus my remarks on governance and i would like to look back over the last decade, and draw a few lessons. shortly after the tragedy of 9/11, a few miles from here, a f
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)